Did You Know? – NCOA Basketball Rules Gazette – 2023/24 Edition 2

 

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“Did You Know?” – NCOA Basketball Rules Gazette – 2023/24 Edition 2
Greetings, fellow basketball officials!
Welcome to the second edition of the NCOA’s "Did You Know?" newsletter, tailored exclusively for our
dedicated group of high school basketball officials. We’re back with more intriguing rule scenarios to
enrich your officiating expertise. We have just a single scenario for you in this edition of the gazette. Let's
dive in:

Rule Scenario:

Team A is inbounding the ball from their frontcourt end line. A1, the inbounder, releases the ball towards
A2, who is standing in the frontcourt. A2 deflects the ball, which then bounces on the floor in the
frontcourt before rolling into the backcourt. A3 retrieves the ball in the backcourt.

Response
Setting the Stage:

There are two main principles that are critical to understand when officiating potential
backcourt violation scenarios: ball status and team control. Ball status defines the location of the ball,
whether it be in the front court or the back court. In order for a backcourt violation to occur, the status
of the ball must change from frontcourt to backcourt. Additionally, for a backcourt violation to occur,
there must first be team control in the frontcourt.

How to Properly Adjudicate this Scenario:

No violation has occurred and play shall resume as normal.
There is team control as soon as the ball is at a team’s disposal for a throw-in. However, the ball has
neither frontcourt nor backcourt status during a throw-in. As soon as the ball touches the floor in the
frontcourt or touches a player in the frontcourt, it has frontcourt status. However, team control is not
established after an inbound pass until a player controls the ball inbounds.

See Rule 9, Section 9, Art. 1; Rule 4, Section 4; Rule 4, Sec*on 12; Case Play 4.12.2 SITUATION B (b)

Pro Tip:

Know the rules. Know the rules not because you have played basketball your whole life or
because you watch a lot of games. Know the rules because you read the Rules Book.
Stay tuned for more captivating rules scenarios and officiating tips in our upcoming newsltters! If you
have a specific scenario or rules question you'd like us to cover in a future edition of the newsletter,
please email Bill and Blake.

Thank you for your commitment to the game and to upholding its integrity by continually honing your
officiating skills.

See you on the hardwood.

Did You Know? – NCOA Basketball Rules Gazette – 2023/24 Edition 1

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“Did You Know?” – NCOA Basketball Rules Gazette – 2023/24 Edition 1

Greetings, fellow basketball officials!

Welcome to the inaugural edition of the NCOA’s "Did You Know?" newsletter, tailored exclusively for our
dedicated group of high school basketball officials. This platform is designed to enrich your officiating
expertise by shedding light on intriguing and lesser-known rule scenarios. Throughout the season, we'll
unravel unique aspects of the game, providing insights on how to navigate them effectively. We have
TWO scenarios for you in this edition of the gazette. Let's jump right in:

Rule Scenario 1:

Offensive player A1 is being trailed by defender B1 along the endline when A2 sets a legal screen in the
path of B1. B1 avoids the screen by crossing the endline and steps out of bounds before returning to the
playing court. Immediately upon B1 regaining inbounds status, A3 attempts to pass the ball to A1. B1
steps in front of A1, intercepts the pass, and is the first player to touch the ball after returning inbounds.


Response:

Setting the Stage:

Historically, it has been a violation for any player (both offensive and defensive) to
intentionally leave the court to gain an advantage. It is important to recognize that it is quite common
for a player’s momentum to take them out of bounds, which has always been legal. The official should
use discretion when judging the intent of a player that leaves the court. Calling a violation for
intentionally leaving the court is quite uncommon. While you should remain vigilant and aware of this
tactic as an illegal strategy, don’t go hunting for it.
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How to Properly Adjudicate this Scenario:

Immediately upon recognizing that B1 is the first player to
touch the ball after returning inbounds, the lead official in this scenario should signal for a violation. The
ball is then awarded to Team A for a throw in at one of the four designated spots nearest to where the
violation occurred. As of the 2023-2024 season, the rule for this type of scenario has changed from the
previous language that required a violation be called for any player intentionally leaving the court,
regardless of their interaction with the ball. The language in the current edition of the rule book now
reads as follows:

Rule 9, Section 3, Art. 3 … A player shall not step out of bounds under the player’s own volition and then
become the first player to touch the ball after returning to the playing court or to avoid a violation.


Pro Tip:

It can be helpful to use a visual signal to indicate that a player has left the court under his/her
own volition, prior to any violation being committed. This preliminary signal can indicate to your partner
that a potential violation is imminent, depending on whether or not the player that left the court is the
first to touch the ball upon returning inbounds. These types of plays often involve action that requires
engagement from both officials in a two-person officiating crew as the pass is likely to come from the
trail’s primary and the path of the player who has the left the court is likely in the lead’s primary. Discuss
this with your partner in your pregame and make sure that you are both prepared to properly adjudicate
and communicate this violation if/when it occurs.

Did You Know? – NCOA Basketball Rules Gazette – 2023/24 Edition 1 - Part 2

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“Did You Know?” – NCOA Basketball Rules Gazette – 2023/24 Edition 1 - Part 2

 

Rule Scenario 2:

Regulation ends with the game tied. Following the sounding of the horn to signal the end of regulation,
and before the jump ball to start the overtime period, the head coach for team A disrespectfully
addresses an official and is correctly assessed a direct technical foul.

Response

Setting the Stage:

As we all know, basketball is an emotional game. It is understandable that in highly
competitive situations players and coaches will react emotionally. We must use our game management
and communication skills throughout the game (and season and our careers) to build rapport with
coaches and players that allow us to deescalate moments of heightened emotion. That being said, as an
organization, we must all agree and be universally committed to upholding a zero-tolerance policy
against disrespectful, belligerent, and abusive behavior, ensuring it is properly penalized. It can take
courage to enforce the technical foul rule at times, but not doing so is a slippery slope and impacts all of
us as officials. What we permit we promote.


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How to Properly Adjudicate this Scenario:

Free throws that result from a technical foul that is committed
after the horn sounds to indicate the end of regulation shall be administered at the start of the overtime
period (Rule 5, Section 6, Art. 2, Exception 4). Any player for Team B is permitted to shoot two free
throws without players on the lane lines to start the overtime period. After the administration of the
free throws, Team B inbounds the ball at the division line opposite the table.

Pro Tip:

In situations where a technical foul is warranted, especially at critical junctures like the end of
regulation or during overtime, it's important to remain composed and confident in your decision. The
pressure of the moment can sometimes lead to second-guessing, but remember that you're enforcing
the rules to ensure a fair and respectful game. After making the call, slow down, separate the players,
speak with your partner(s) to ensure the crew is on the same page, clearly communicate the decision to
the scorer's table. This scenario likely warrants additional brief and concise communication to both
coaches, which should be done individually and to clarify that the free throws will be shot as a part of
the overtime, not the end of regulation. This transparency helps everyone understand the call and the
resulting consequences, reducing potential confusion or conflict.

Stay tuned for more captivating rules scenarios and officiating tips in our upcoming newsletters! If you
have a specific scenario or rules question you'd like us to cover in a future edition of the newsletter,
please email Bill and Blake.

Thank you for your commitment to the game and to upholding its integrity by continually honing your
officiating skills.


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